Parent Page

Preventing Child Sexual Abuse
An estimated one in three girls and one in seven boys are sexually abused before age 18. It's important to teach children about safety and to teach ourselves about the warning signs of abuse.
 
WAYS TO TEACH BODY SAFETY TO YOUR CHILDREN
  • Teach your children about the difference between good touch and bad touch.
  • Teach and use the proper names for body parts.
  • Set and respect family privacy boundaries.
  • Tell your child it's OK to say "no" to an adult.
  • Stay attuned to your child's use of technology.
  • Be sure your children know they'll be supported when they request privacy or say no to an activity or type of touch that makes them feel uncomfortable.
  • Encourage your children to confide in a "safe adult" (school counselor, grandparent, trusted family friend, etc.) if they feel they can't talk to you.
RECOMMENDED SEXUAL ABUSE PREVENTION RESOURCES
HOW SAFE CAN HELP
 
SAFE offers free Stewards of Children child sexual abuse prevention training to churches, schools and youth serving organizations. Please contact SAFE community educator Tim Murphy at (336) 838-9169 to schedule a free training for your group.
 

Preventing Teen Relationship Abuse
An estimated 30% of teens have worried about their physical safety in a relationship. Two out of three abuse victims never tell anyone. Parents need to know the signs and respond appropriately. 
 
SIGNS OF AN UNHEALTHY RELATIONSHIP
  • Put downs
  • Threats
  • Relationship develops quickly and soon is all consuming. Old friends and activities fall by the wayside.
  • Temper fits
  • Trapped feeling
  • Couple can't get along, but can't seem to break up.
  • Inappropriate jealousy.
  • Stalking and tracking behaviors, including "textual harassment."
  • Blaming the victim. ("You make me so mad.")
  • Apologizes, then hurts the victim all over again.
HOW PARENTS CAN HELP
  • Talk about the hallmarks of healthy relationships, including respect, trust, sense of humor.
  • Offer opportunities to talk.
  • Listen more than you speak.
  • Resist the temptation to "bash" the abusive partner.
  • Show respect in your own relationships.
  • Encourage your child to talk to a trusted adult if he or she can't talk to you.
  • Tell your child, "I'm here to help, not to judge."
  • Focus on feelings. "How did you feel when...?"
RECOMMENDED TEEN RELATIONSHIP RESOURCES

 
HOW SAFE CAN HELP
 
SAFE offers SAFE Dates, a research-validated teen dating abuse prevention program, in ninth grade Health classes in the Wilkes County school system.
 
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